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image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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image: Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

By | October 20, 2015

A new estimate of the origin of life on Earth pushes back the date by 300 million years.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.


image: Persistent Virus

Persistent Virus

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers detect Ebola virus fragments in semen samples from some male survivors up to nine months after the onset of symptoms.


image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.


image: Polar Dino Discovered

Polar Dino Discovered

By | September 28, 2015

Researchers working in Alaska, above the Arctic Circle, have unearthed the northernmost species of dinosaur ever found.


image: Tree of Life v1.0

Tree of Life v1.0

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers map 2.3 million species in a single phylogeny. 


image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.


image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | September 4, 2015

Liberia is again declared free of Ebola transmission, which continues—at reduced rates—in Guinea and Sierra Leone.


image: Contributors


By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.


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