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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | November 20, 2015

Health officials confirm a case of Ebola in Liberia, which was declared free of transmissions in September. 

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

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image: WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

By | November 9, 2015

Like neighboring Liberia, the country has entered a 90-day surveillance period, according to the World Health Organization. Transmission continues at a reduced rate in Guinea.

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image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

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image: Evolution of the Penis

Evolution of the Penis

By | October 30, 2015

A phallus-less reptile goes through a developmental stage with external genitalia, suggesting a common origin for the organ among amniotes.

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image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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