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image: Pumpkins Saved By People?

Pumpkins Saved By People?

By | November 25, 2015

Domestication may have saved pumpkins, gourds, and squash as seed dispersers like the mastodon went extinct. 

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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | November 20, 2015

Health officials confirm a case of Ebola in Liberia, which was declared free of transmissions in September. 

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image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

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image: Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

Supergene Explains Ruff Mating

By | November 18, 2015

Two sequencing studies reveal the genetics underlying the sexual behavior of the European and Asian birds.

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image: Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

By | November 16, 2015

Researchers decode mitochondrial DNA from the 500-year-old remains of a native South American child, revealing a new line of maternal ancestors.

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image: WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

By | November 9, 2015

Like neighboring Liberia, the country has entered a 90-day surveillance period, according to the World Health Organization. Transmission continues at a reduced rate in Guinea.

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image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

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image: Three Origins for Rice?

Three Origins for Rice?

By | November 3, 2015

Rice was domesticated three separate times across Asia, a new study suggests.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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