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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

2 Comments

image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: Rapid Ebola Test Approved

Rapid Ebola Test Approved

By | February 24, 2015

The World Health Organization OKs the first 15-minute Ebola diagnostic test.

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image: FDA OKs 23andMe Test

FDA OKs 23andMe Test

By | February 20, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration will allow the personal genomics company to resume a disease-risk analysis.

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image: USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

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image: Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

By | February 12, 2015

Ebola virus can remain infectious for up to seven days on the bodies of monkeys that died from the disease, researchers show.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Methylation Predicts Mortality

Methylation Predicts Mortality

By | February 3, 2015

A study finds a link between patterns of methylation in the human genome and people’s life span.

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image: Ebola Drug Trial Canceled

Ebola Drug Trial Canceled

By | February 2, 2015

As the number of Ebola cases declines, Chimerix is unable to recruit enough patients for its trial in Liberia testing the antiviral drug brincidofovir.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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