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Ebola Update

By | January 12, 2015

Researchers gear up for efficacy trials of experimental Ebola vaccines in Africa.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 12, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: 23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

By | January 7, 2015

Firms enter a multi-year deal for the analysis of whole-genome sequence data, with an eye toward drug discovery for Parkinson’s disease.

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image: Custom Creatures?

Custom Creatures?

By | January 6, 2015

San Francisco-based biotech wants to see its technology applied for inventing new organisms.

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image: Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

By | January 5, 2015

A new guinea pig model of Ebola viral transmission shows that direct contact with infected animals is not necessary to catch the disease.

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image: Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

By | January 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley. Age: 39

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image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

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image: Mistaken Identities

Mistaken Identities

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers are working to automate the arduous task of identifying—and amending—mislabeled sequences in genetic databases.

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image: Bats the Source of Ebola?

Bats the Source of Ebola?

By | December 30, 2014

The epidemic in West Africa may have been sparked by bats in Guinea, researchers propose, but concrete evidence of the route of zoonotic infection is lacking.

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