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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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image: Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

By | July 20, 2016

Researchers engineer bacteria that deliver an anti-tumor toxin in mice before self-destructing. 

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Lost Colonies

Lost Colonies

By | October 1, 2015

Next-generation sequencing has identified scores of new microorganisms, but getting even abundant bacterial species to grow in the lab has proven challenging.

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image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

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image: UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

By | January 28, 2015

Using ultraviolet light to disinfect drinking water may simply drive bacteria to dormancy, rather than kill them.

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