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Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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While some in the scientific and religious communities have declared an end to the tensions between faith and fact, the conflict continues to have impacts on health, politics, and the environment.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2015

May 2015's selection of notable quotes

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Think Before You Fire

By | May 1, 2015

Industry layoffs may save a few dollars, at the cost of losing the collective brainpower of thousands of scientists.

4 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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