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image: Benefits of Missing MYC

Benefits of Missing MYC

By | January 22, 2015

Mice engineered to have just one copy of the gene Myc live longer, healthier lives than wild-type animals.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

By | December 30, 2014

From stem cells, scientists generate early egg- and sperm-like cells in vitro.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

image: Similarities and Differences

Similarities and Differences

By | November 21, 2014

Results from the Mouse ENCODE project point to key divergences in gene regulation architecture compared to humans.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.

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image: How a Memory Is Made

How a Memory Is Made

By | November 13, 2014

Transcription factor levels dictate which neurons in a network store a memory.

1 Comment

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