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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

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image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.

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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

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image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

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image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

5 Comments

image: Evolutionary Biologist Dies

Evolutionary Biologist Dies

By | January 2, 2013

Carl Woese, the discoverer of the third domain of life, has passed away at age 84.

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