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image: Telltale Mouth Microbes

Telltale Mouth Microbes

By | September 9, 2015

The composition of the plaque microbiome can reveal a child’s risk of dental caries months before the decay appears, according to a study.

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image: Breathing in Bacteria

Breathing in Bacteria

By | January 22, 2015

The healthy lung receives microbes from the mouth, a new model suggests.

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image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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image: Mining the Mouth’s Many Microbes

Mining the Mouth’s Many Microbes

By | June 18, 2014

The oral cavity contains several distinct and dynamic microbial communities, and some of these commensals may seed the body’s other microbiomes.

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image: Mouth Microbes Influenced by Ethnicity

Mouth Microbes Influenced by Ethnicity

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers identify oral microbiome signatures that correlate with a person’s cultural background.

3 Comments

image: Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

By | August 14, 2013

Two studies peg down how a bacterium indigenous to the oral cavity can contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.

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image: News from Cell

News from Cell

By | December 9, 2011

Some of the highlights from this year’s American Society for Cell Biology meeting, held earlier this week

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