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image: Viral Hijackers

Viral Hijackers

By | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in immunology

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image: Model Liver

Model Liver

By | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in physiology

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image: Truly Phenome-nal

Truly Phenome-nal

By | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in microbiology

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image: Taking Aim at Melanoma

Taking Aim at Melanoma

By | April 1, 2011

Understanding oncogenesis at the molecular level offers the prospect of tailoring treatments much more precisely for patients with advanced cases of this deadliest of skin cancers.

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image: Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

By | April 1, 2011

Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, including a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, that interweaved practical medical knowledge with Buddhist traditions and local lore.

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image: Medical Publishing for an N of One

Medical Publishing for an N of One

By | April 1, 2011

New technologies and mind-sets are required for information delivery in the age of genomics.

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By | April 1, 2011

By The Scientist staff | April 1, 2011

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image: The “Me Decade” of Cancer

The “Me Decade” of Cancer

By | April 1, 2011

Drugs that target specific tumors are harbingers of a new era of genetically informed medicine.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2011

The Great Sperm Whale, Noble Cows & Hybrid Zebras, Radioactive, Science-Mart

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image: Top 7 From F1000

Top 7 From F1000

By | April 1, 2011

A snapshot of the highest-ranked articles from a 30-day period on Faculty of 1000

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