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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

By | May 23, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights Roche’s Tecentriq, which blocks a protein that obstructs the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.

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Certain drugs could worsen graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients, scientists show.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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image: Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

By | April 27, 2016

Sperm-binding, peptide–coated beads work as an implantable contraception device in mice and as a means of selecting human sperm for assisted reproduction techniques, researchers show. 

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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