The Scientist

» oocyte, ecology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

0 Comments

image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

2 Comments

image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

0 Comments

image: Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

By | April 27, 2016

Sperm-binding, peptide–coated beads work as an implantable contraception device in mice and as a means of selecting human sperm for assisted reproduction techniques, researchers show. 

0 Comments

image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

1 Comment

image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

0 Comments

A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech