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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

13 Comments

image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: Bile Benefits

Bile Benefits

By | November 1, 2015

Diverting the bile duct around a long stretch of the small intestine could treat obesity without cutting out chunks of the digestive tract.

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image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

1 Comment

image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

By | October 12, 2015

Despite known problems with contamination and mislabeled cell lines, most researchers continue to operate without authenticating cells’ identity.

2 Comments

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