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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

13 Comments

image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: Bile Benefits

Bile Benefits

By | November 1, 2015

Diverting the bile duct around a long stretch of the small intestine could treat obesity without cutting out chunks of the digestive tract.

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image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

1 Comment

image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

By | October 12, 2015

Despite known problems with contamination and mislabeled cell lines, most researchers continue to operate without authenticating cells’ identity.

2 Comments

image: Warming Up to Brown Fat

Warming Up to Brown Fat

By | October 8, 2015

Scientists know how to turn on these fat-combusting cells. Can these energy burners be used to combat obesity?

6 Comments

image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

1 Comment

image: Ready, Willing, and Able

Ready, Willing, and Able

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers with disabilities are making their fields more accessible.

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