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image: Mapping the Human Proteome

Mapping the Human Proteome

By | November 10, 2014

A comprehensive map of human proteins throughout the body identifies the testes as home to the most unique blend of gene products.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Tailoring Your Proteome View

Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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image: Added Layers of Proteome Complexity

Added Layers of Proteome Complexity

By | July 17, 2014

Scientists discover a broad spectrum of alternatively spliced human protein variants within a well-studied family of genes.  

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image: Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

By | July 8, 2014

Proteomic data suggest the human genome may encode fewer than 20,000 genes.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

By | July 1, 2014

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Interactome Analysis

Interactome Analysis

By | June 17, 2014

Study examines tissue-specific protein interactions linked to hereditary diseases.

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