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» proteomics and immunology

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Interactome Analysis

Interactome Analysis

By | June 17, 2014

Study examines tissue-specific protein interactions linked to hereditary diseases.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Moving Target

Moving Target

By | June 1, 2014

New mass spectrometry–based techniques are blurring the lines between discovery and targeted proteomics.

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image: Week in Review: May 26–30

Week in Review: May 26–30

By | May 30, 2014

Human proteome cataloged; island-separated crickets evolved silence; molecule shows promise for combatting coronaviruses; study replication etiquette; another call for STAP retraction

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image: Human Proteome Mapped

Human Proteome Mapped

By | May 28, 2014

Compiling mass spectrometry profiles of human tissues and cell lines, two separate groups publish near-complete drafts of the human proteome.

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image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Accelerating Antibody Discovery

Accelerating Antibody Discovery

By | May 1, 2014

Techniques for faster discovery and isolation of human monoclonal antibodies

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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