The Scientist

» proteomics and culture

Most Recent

image: Scientific Elevator Pitches

Scientific Elevator Pitches

By | August 1, 2014

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.


image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life


image: Added Layers of Proteome Complexity

Added Layers of Proteome Complexity

By | July 17, 2014

Scientists discover a broad spectrum of alternatively spliced human protein variants within a well-studied family of genes.  

1 Comment

image: Books on the <em>Beagle</em>

Books on the Beagle

By | July 17, 2014

An online reconstruction makes the library from Darwin’s famed ship more accessible. 


image: The Genetics of Friendship

The Genetics of Friendship

By | July 16, 2014

People tend to choose friends who share their genes, a study suggests.


image: Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

By | July 8, 2014

Proteomic data suggest the human genome may encode fewer than 20,000 genes.

1 Comment

image: Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

By | July 1, 2014

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Nature’s Nether Regions</em>

Book Excerpt from Nature’s Nether Regions

By | July 1, 2014

In Chapter 6, “Bateman Returns,” author Menno Schilthuizen surveys the battlefield of the evolutionary arms race that has led to, among other things, such excesses as “traumatic sex.”


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2014

Sex on Earth, Wild Connection, The Classification of Sex, and XL Love


image: Going Beyond the Lab

Going Beyond the Lab

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists who study the biological roots of sexual orientation should continue working with educators, policy-makers, and the public to put their data to good use.


Popular Now

  1. Rethinking the Rise of Mammals
    Daily News Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

    Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

  2. Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity
  3. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

  4. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

Life Technologies