The Scientist

» proteomics and developmental biology

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

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image: Heart-Healthy Hibernators

Heart-Healthy Hibernators

By | January 1, 2016

Overwintering ground squirrels survive fluctuations in body temperature that would cause cardiac arrest in nonhibernators.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Cracking the Complex

Cracking the Complex

By | November 1, 2015

Using mass spec to study protein-protein interactions

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image: Probing Down Syndrome with Mini Brains

Probing Down Syndrome with Mini Brains

By | October 20, 2015

Researchers create cerebral organoids using induced pluripotent stem cells from patient skin cells and characterize protein-expression changes linked to cognitive impairment.

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