The Scientist

» proteomics and ecology

Most Recent

image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: May 26–30

Week in Review: May 26–30

By | May 30, 2014

Human proteome cataloged; island-separated crickets evolved silence; molecule shows promise for combatting coronaviruses; study replication etiquette; another call for STAP retraction

0 Comments

image: Human Proteome Mapped

Human Proteome Mapped

By | May 28, 2014

Compiling mass spectrometry profiles of human tissues and cell lines, two separate groups publish near-complete drafts of the human proteome.

2 Comments

image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

0 Comments

image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

1 Comment

image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

0 Comments

image: Accelerating Antibody Discovery

Accelerating Antibody Discovery

By | May 1, 2014

Techniques for faster discovery and isolation of human monoclonal antibodies

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

0 Comments

image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

0 Comments

image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Largest Human Genetic Variation Repository Yet
  2. With CRISPR, Scientists Make Neurons From Fibroblasts
  3. The Neanderthal in the Mirror
    Reading Frames The Neanderthal in the Mirror

    Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

  4. Student Alleges His Team Didn’t Earn CRISPR Patent
RayBiotech