The Scientist

» proteomics and evolution

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Sleepy Squirrels

Sleepy Squirrels

By | January 1, 2016

Visit the lab of Matthew Andrews at the University of Minnesota Duluth, who studies hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels to learn how their hearts manage extreme temperature fluctuations.

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Heart-Healthy Hibernators

Heart-Healthy Hibernators

By | January 1, 2016

Overwintering ground squirrels survive fluctuations in body temperature that would cause cardiac arrest in nonhibernators.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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