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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: AbbVie Wins Bidding War for Cancer Drugmaker

AbbVie Wins Bidding War for Cancer Drugmaker

By | March 5, 2015

The pharmaceutical firm beat out a host of potential suitors, Johnson & Johnson among them, to strike a $21 billion deal with Pharmacyclics.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Pfizer to Acquire Hospira

Pfizer to Acquire Hospira

By | February 5, 2015

The pharmaceutical giant is purchasing the injectable drugmaker for about $15 billion.

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image: Lazarus Drugs

Lazarus Drugs

By | February 1, 2015

While some drugs sail through development, others suffer setbacks, including FDA rejections, before reaching the market.  

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Roche Buys Bioinformatics Firm

Roche Buys Bioinformatics Firm

By | December 22, 2014

The pharmaceutical giant will pay an undisclosed price to acquire Bina Technologies.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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