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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

By | March 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Huffington Center On Aging, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 38

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

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image: FDA OKs 23andMe Test

FDA OKs 23andMe Test

By | February 20, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration will allow the personal genomics company to resume a disease-risk analysis.

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image: USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Pfizer to Acquire Hospira

Pfizer to Acquire Hospira

By | February 5, 2015

The pharmaceutical giant is purchasing the injectable drugmaker for about $15 billion.

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image: Methylation Predicts Mortality

Methylation Predicts Mortality

By | February 3, 2015

A study finds a link between patterns of methylation in the human genome and people’s life span.

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