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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Human Proteome Project Update

Human Proteome Project Update

By | January 24, 2013

Researchers report steady progress in the effort to map all the proteins made by human chromosomes.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Timing Turnover

Timing Turnover

By | November 1, 2012

Two-tone fluorescent tags track the movement and life span of proteins within living cells.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

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