The Scientist

» proteins, ecology and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: A Greener Arctic

A Greener Arctic

By | June 11, 2012

Algal blooms are appearing under the ice in the Arctic Ocean in areas thought to receive too little light to support photosynthetic life.

0 Comments

image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

0 Comments

Contributors

June 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Next Generation: The Brain Bot

Next Generation: The Brain Bot

By | May 29, 2012

A 30-year-old technique to record the electrical activity of neurons gets a robotic makeover.

0 Comments

image: Cancer Exosomes Promote Metastasis

Cancer Exosomes Promote Metastasis

By | May 29, 2012

Vesicles released by melanoma cells stimulate pro-metastasis behaviors in bone marrow cells.

2 Comments

image: Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

By | May 28, 2012

Radioactive particles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster provide an unexpected way to track migratory marine species.

5 Comments

image: Food's Afterlife

Food's Afterlife

By | May 25, 2012

Meals left to mold develop colors, mycelia, and beads of digested juices, sparking the eye of an artist, and the slight concern of a mycologist.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Bio-Art Winners

2012 Bio-Art Winners

By | May 25, 2012

Check out the 10 images that won FASEB's first annual Bio-Art competition.

0 Comments

image: DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

By | May 24, 2012

A new SNP assay can determine the geographical origin of commonly overexploited fish species.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech