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» Mars and developmental biology

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image: Curiosity Finds Clay on Mars

Curiosity Finds Clay on Mars

By | March 14, 2013

NASA’s rover has identified clay in its first drilled sample, signaling that the planet once had a wet and hospitable environment.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Signs of Life on Mars?

Signs of Life on Mars?

By | December 4, 2012

Tests run on Martian soil samples indicate the presence of organic compounds, but the traces of carbon may or may not have come from once-living things.

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image: The Martian Tempest

The Martian Tempest

By | November 26, 2012

NASA scientists are closely watching a dust storm on Mars that threatens to go global and interfere with rovers on the planet’s surface.

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image: With No Methane, Life on Mars Unlikely

With No Methane, Life on Mars Unlikely

By | November 7, 2012

Hopes of finding life on the Red Planet have been deflated after NASA announced that Curiosity has yet to detect notable amounts of methane in the Martian atmosphere.

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