The Scientist

» Mars and ecology

Most Recent

image: The Martian Tempest

The Martian Tempest

By | November 26, 2012

NASA scientists are closely watching a dust storm on Mars that threatens to go global and interfere with rovers on the planet’s surface.

0 Comments

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: With No Methane, Life on Mars Unlikely

With No Methane, Life on Mars Unlikely

By | November 7, 2012

Hopes of finding life on the Red Planet have been deflated after NASA announced that Curiosity has yet to detect notable amounts of methane in the Martian atmosphere.

0 Comments

image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

1 Comment

image: The Birthday Conference

The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

0 Comments

image: A Celebrated Symposium

A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

1 Comment

image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS