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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: Update to US Chemical Regulations Expected

Update to US Chemical Regulations Expected

By | June 8, 2016

Following approval by Congress, the president will decide on an update the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: House Passes Watered-Down Zika Aid Bill

House Passes Watered-Down Zika Aid Bill

By | May 20, 2016

The legislation allocates only $622 million to the effort to help the country respond to the impending spread of the mosquito-borne disease.

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The US Senate is reviewing a bill that would extend a ban on so-called three-parent embryos.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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