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image: E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

By | May 24, 2016

Newly published research on the key ingredient in the Monsanto-made weed killer is holding up lawmakers’ decisions on whether to continue to allow its sale in Europe.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

1 Comment

image: FDA to Test for Glyphosate in Food

FDA to Test for Glyphosate in Food

By | February 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration will begin testing certain foods for residues of the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup.

1 Comment

image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Legacies Left Behind in 2015

Legacies Left Behind in 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A look at the contributions of some of the prominent researchers who died this year

3 Comments

image: TS 2015 Gift Guide

TS 2015 Gift Guide

By | December 15, 2015

Check out these life science–inspired gifts

2 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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