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Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2014

The Myth of Mirror Neurons, Curious, Shadow Medicine, and Doctored

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image: Connecting the Dots

Connecting the Dots

By | August 1, 2014

Extending her initial studies of social wasps, Mary Jane West-Eberhard has spent her career probing the evolutionary relationship between social behavior and developmental flexibility.

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Contributors

By | August 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

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Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

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Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2014

August 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Stressing and FRETing

Stressing and FRETing

By | August 1, 2014

Two labs have produced FRET-based systems for real-time analysis of a plant stress hormone.

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image: Tailoring Your Proteome View

Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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