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image: Cortex Tour

Cortex Tour

By | November 1, 2013

Travel through the outer layers of a mouse brain thanks to array tomography and Stanford University's Stephen Smith.

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Salary Stats

By | November 1, 2013

Surprising trends reveal themselves in this year's Salary Survey statistics.

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image: Seeing Double

Seeing Double

By | November 1, 2013

Combining two imaging techniques integrates molecular specificity with nanometer-scale resolution.  

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image: Some Nerve

Some Nerve

By | November 1, 2013

The neuron-inspired art of erstwhile neuroscientist Greg Dunn

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Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Synapses on Stage

Synapses on Stage

By | November 1, 2013

Light microscopy techniques that spotlight neural connections in the brain

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image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

By | October 20, 2013

Researchers design a clear cellular scaffold called a hydrogel that can be used to detect and transmit light to cells in vivo.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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