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image: Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

By | October 13, 2014

Researchers craft hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells, paving the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

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image: Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

Mom’s Mitochondria Affect Pup Longevity

By | October 9, 2014

Mitochondrial mutations inherited from the mother can shorten a mouse’s lifespan.

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image: Capturing Complexes

Capturing Complexes

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for analyzing RNA-protein interactions

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image: Cone Cell Correctors

Cone Cell Correctors

By | October 1, 2014

In mice, adult cone cell outer segments and their visual functions deteriorate if two microRNAs are not present.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

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