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image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Name That Metabolite!

Name That Metabolite!

By | July 1, 2013

A guided tour through the metabolome

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

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image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

By | June 26, 2013

A new book by an evolution historian asserts that Darwin and Wallace developed their theories of evolution independently.

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image: Dead or Alive?

Dead or Alive?

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists create nontoxic pH nanosensors to assess viability of transplanted therapeutic cells.

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image: Decoding DNA: New Twists and Turns

Decoding DNA: New Twists and Turns

By | June 1, 2013

Highlights from a series of three webinars on the future of genome research, held by The Scientist to celebrate 60 years of the DNA double helix

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image: Evolution Takes a Road Trip

Evolution Takes a Road Trip

By | June 1, 2013

Highways and byways are among the man-made environmental alterations driving the evolution of animals on contemporary timescales, with implications for ecology.

3 Comments

image: In Evolution's Garden

In Evolution's Garden

By | June 1, 2013

Raising one evolutionary question after another, Brandon Gaut has harvested a crop of novel findings about how plant genomes evolve.

4 Comments

image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

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