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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: Additional Zika Tests in Development

Additional Zika Tests in Development

By | February 3, 2016

Scientists design diagnostics to improve the detection of current infections.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Exercises for Your Abs

Exercises for Your Abs

By | February 1, 2016

Companies make the antibodies, but it’s up to you to make sure they work in your experiments.

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image: Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

By | February 1, 2016

Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.

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image: Marriages of Opportunity

Marriages of Opportunity

By | February 1, 2016

New ideas for antibody-drug conjugate design

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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