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image: Massively Parallel Perturbations

Massively Parallel Perturbations

By | March 1, 2017

Scientists combine CRISPR gene editing with single-cell sequencing for genotype-phenotype screens.

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

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image: Infographic: Mapping Musicality

Infographic: Mapping Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Huge areas of the brain respond to any sort of auditory stimulus, making it difficult for scientists to nail down regions that are important for music processing.

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image: Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

By | March 1, 2017

See how two new methods track responses to unique genetic manipulations in numerous individual cells in parallel.

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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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