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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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image: Doors and Pores

Doors and Pores

By | December 1, 2016

The awesome architecture of the gateways to the nucleus

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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image: Pushing Boundaries

Pushing Boundaries

By | December 1, 2016

Applying physics, chemistry, and cell biology, Satyajit Mayor seeks to understand how cell membranes work.

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image: Synthetic Sensors

Synthetic Sensors

By | December 1, 2016

Engineered circuits detect endogenous transcription factors to drive cellular outputs.

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image: Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

By | December 1, 2016

Improvements in instruments and statistical tools allow the capture and analysis of large data sets.

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image: Video: Cells, Skin Deep

Video: Cells, Skin Deep

By | December 1, 2016

Profilee Satyajit Mayor discusses his explorations of cell membranes, which are helping to update the classical fluid mosaic model of dynamic cellular boundaries.

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