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image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: An Array of Options

An Array of Options

By | June 1, 2015

A guide for how and when to transition from the microarray to RNA-seq

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

By | June 1, 2015

Novel microfluidic devices give researchers new ways to count and sort single cells.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: RNA Stucturomics

RNA Stucturomics

By | June 1, 2015

A new high-throughput, transcriptome-wide assay determines RNA structures in vivo.

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