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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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A test tube-based genome-labeling technique has been brought under the microscope.

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image: Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

By | December 29, 2016

Audio recordings of bats hashing out disputes reveals that their calls are laden with information about identity and intent.

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image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

By | December 20, 2016

Reductions in the volume of gray matter in specific regions appear to represent synaptic pruning, a new study suggests, that tunes a mother’s brain to childcare.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2016

Top Technical Advances 2016

By | December 15, 2016

The year’s most impressive achievements include methods to watch translation in cells, trace cell fates, avoid mitochondrial mutations, edit DNA, and build antibiotics from scratch.

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Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

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image: A Tale of Two Tails

A Tale of Two Tails

By | December 7, 2016

An analysis of ancient fish fossils suggests that mammalian and fish tails are fundamentally different structures, each with unique evolutionary histories.

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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