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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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image: Capturing Complexes

Capturing Complexes

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for analyzing RNA-protein interactions

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

By | September 23, 2014

Lengthy stints in intensive care units pare down patients’ gut microflora, a study shows.

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image: Small Molecule Superstore

Small Molecule Superstore

By | September 15, 2014

An analysis of bacterial sequences from the Human Microbiome Project has uncovered thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters.

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