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image: Your Brain on Art

Your Brain on Art

By | May 1, 2014

A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

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image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: High-Density Info

High-Density Info

By | April 1, 2014

New developments in protein array technology

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image: New Blood, circa 1914

New Blood, circa 1914

By | April 1, 2014

World War I provided testing grounds for novel blood-transfusion techniques.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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