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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Synthetic Sensors

Synthetic Sensors

By | December 1, 2016

Engineered circuits detect endogenous transcription factors to drive cellular outputs.

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image: Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

By | December 1, 2016

Improvements in instruments and statistical tools allow the capture and analysis of large data sets.

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image: Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

Infographic: How to Build a Synthetic Sensor

By | December 1, 2016

Scientists designed a genetic sensor-and-readout system, based on detecting a transcription factor, that performs a custom cellular activity.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

By | November 22, 2016

The International Human Epigenome Consortium presents a series of studies on how epigenetics influences immunity, cell lineage determination, and differentiation.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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