The Scientist

» techniques, immunology and neuroscience

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image: Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

By | August 8, 2016

Great frigatebirds can sleep while flying, researchers report.

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image: Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

By | August 1, 2016

Preliminary research suggests that the brains of schizophrenia patients may regain tissue mass as the illness wears on.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | August 1, 2016

Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention

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image: How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

By | August 1, 2016

A point-and-click interface alternative to command-line tools that allows researchers to easily create, run, and troubleshoot serial sequence analyses

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Software for Image Analysis

Software for Image Analysis

By | August 1, 2016

Profiles of five programs for quantifying data from Westerns, dot blots, gels, and colony cultures

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image: The Death of Diets

The Death of Diets

By | August 1, 2016

Book author and neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt discusses her own struggle with her weight and the science behind breaking the cycle of gain and loss.

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image: The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

By | August 1, 2016

Can oxytocin help increase eye contact in patients with autism, thus opening up a whole new world of social interaction?

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