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image: Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

Phosphorylation at the Flick of a Switch

By | May 1, 2017

Incorporating light-controlled dimerization domains into kinases provides tight regulation of these enzymes.

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image: Picking Out Patterns

Picking Out Patterns

By | May 1, 2017

Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and data.

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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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image: Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

Infographic: Enzymes Controlled by Light

By | May 1, 2017

Custom-designed kinases have built-in switches that act as gatekeepers for the enzymes' active sites.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell's protein-degrading machine

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image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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