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Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Light-Operated Drugs

Light-Operated Drugs

By | November 1, 2014

Scientists create a photosensitive pharmaceutical to target a glutamate receptor.

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image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

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Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

By | November 1, 2014

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

2 Comments

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Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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White’s the Matter

By | November 1, 2014

A basic guide to white matter imaging using diffusion MRI

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Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

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