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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

By | April 1, 2016

A braided structure and some adhesive hydrogel make therapeutic microRNAs both stable and sticky.

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image: New Test for Zika OKed

New Test for Zika OKed

By | March 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval for a combination diagnostic that can distinguish between Zika, dengue, and chikungunya infections.

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image: CRISPR Can Tag RNA

CRISPR Can Tag RNA

By | March 21, 2016

Modifications to the DNA-slicing program allow for monitoring the movement of messenger RNA.

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image: How to Use P-Values Correctly

How to Use P-Values Correctly

By | March 9, 2016

The American Statistical Association offers guidance on best practices for the oft-misused tool.

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

By | March 7, 2016

Two studies temper the dismal assessment of psychology and economics researchers’ abilities to replicate one another’s experiments.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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