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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Neurons from Glia In Vivo

Neurons from Glia In Vivo

By | October 19, 2015

Scientists present new recipes for directly converting glial cells to neurons in mouse brains.

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image: Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

Optogenetics Advances in Monkeys

By | October 5, 2015

Researchers have selectively activated a specific neural pathway to manipulate a primate’s behavior.

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image: Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

By | October 1, 2015

Micromanaging neuronal behavior with optogenetics

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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image: Brain Freeze

Brain Freeze

By | October 1, 2015

A common tissue fixation method distorts the true neuronal landscape.

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image: Decon Recon

Decon Recon

By | October 1, 2015

Published genomes are chock-full of contamination. But as awareness of the problem grows, so do methods to help combat it.

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image: Holding Neurons Steady

Holding Neurons Steady

By | October 1, 2015

Scientists engineer a feedback loop to fine-tune neuron activity with optogenetics.

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image: Into the Limelight

Into the Limelight

By | October 1, 2015

Glial cells were once considered neurons’ supporting actors, but new methods and model organisms are revealing their true importance in brain function.

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