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image: Free Flow

Free Flow

By | December 1, 2015

A sampling of free software for flow cytometry data analysis

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image: It’s Getting Hot in Here

It’s Getting Hot in Here

By | December 1, 2015

Methods for taking a cell's temperature

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image: Looking for Loners

Looking for Loners

By | December 1, 2015

A new algorithm opens doors for detecting rare cell types in mRNA sequencing.

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image: Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

Single-Cell Suck-and-Spray

By | December 1, 2015

A nanoscopic needle and a mass spectrometer reveal the contents of individual cells.

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image: Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

By | November 30, 2015

A second doctor shows symptoms of ocular disease after recovering from Ebola infection.

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Cracking the Complex

Cracking the Complex

By | November 1, 2015

Using mass spec to study protein-protein interactions

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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