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image: Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

Next-Gen Sequencing User Survey

By | November 1, 2014

Outsourcing is still the rule and data analysis, the bottleneck.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: The Body Electric, 1840s

The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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image: White’s the Matter

White’s the Matter

By | November 1, 2014

A basic guide to white matter imaging using diffusion MRI

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image: Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

Electromagnetism Promotes Pluripotency: Study

By | October 23, 2014

A paper published last month claims that electromagnetic exposure facilitates cell reprogramming, but some scientists question the evidence.

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image: Capturing Complexes

Capturing Complexes

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for analyzing RNA-protein interactions

1 Comment

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Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nuclear Cartography

Nuclear Cartography

By | October 1, 2014

Techniques for mapping chromosome conformation

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

2 Comments

image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

2 Comments

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