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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | January 1, 2014

Scientists come up with a better way to watch cells leave blood vessels.

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image: 2013’s Big Advances in Science

2013’s Big Advances in Science

By | December 24, 2013

A roundup of the stunning progress made in the life sciences this year

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image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

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image: Retinal Cells Printed by Inkjet

Retinal Cells Printed by Inkjet

By | December 19, 2013

Scientists demonstrate how to print healthy rat retinal cells.

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image: Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

Dogs, Dust Microbes, and Allergies

By | December 16, 2013

Dust-borne bacteria from houses with dogs can prevent allergies in mice by changing their gut microbes.

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image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

5 Comments

image: Inside Information

Inside Information

By | December 16, 2013

Researchers develop a nanobiopsy technique for sampling the contents of living cells.

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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

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image: CRISPR for Cures?

CRISPR for Cures?

By | December 5, 2013

Studies in mice and human stem cells demonstrate that the genome-editing technique CRISPR can correct disease-causing mutations.

2 Comments

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