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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: Faulty Freezing

Faulty Freezing

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that tissues are more likely than single cells to suffer damage during cryopreservation because of the tight junctions between cells.

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image: Tracking Troubles

Tracking Troubles

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers show that tagging marine animals could disrupt their ability to live normal lives.

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image: Cortex Tour

Cortex Tour

By | November 1, 2013

Travel through the outer layers of a mouse brain thanks to array tomography and Stanford University's Stephen Smith.

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image: Seeing Double

Seeing Double

By | November 1, 2013

Combining two imaging techniques integrates molecular specificity with nanometer-scale resolution.  

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image: Synapses on Stage

Synapses on Stage

By | November 1, 2013

Light microscopy techniques that spotlight neural connections in the brain

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

Next Generation: Cells Communicate with Light

By | October 20, 2013

Researchers design a clear cellular scaffold called a hydrogel that can be used to detect and transmit light to cells in vivo.

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