The Scientist

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image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

3 Comments

image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?

3 Comments

image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Down for the Count

Down for the Count

By | May 1, 2013

One, two, three, four . . . . Counting colonies and plaques can be tedious, but tools exist to streamline the process.

1 Comment

image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

1 Comment

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