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image: Student Fights Harassment with Wikipedia

Student Fights Harassment with Wikipedia

By | March 10, 2016

Every time Emily Temple-Wood receives an inappropriate email, she writes a Wikipedia entry about a woman scientist.

8 Comments

image: How to Use P-Values Correctly

How to Use P-Values Correctly

By | March 9, 2016

The American Statistical Association offers guidance on best practices for the oft-misused tool.

1 Comment

image: Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

By | March 7, 2016

Two studies temper the dismal assessment of psychology and economics researchers’ abilities to replicate one another’s experiments.

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image: While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Assessing body position in addition to activity may improve monitoring of sleep-wake periods.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.

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image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2016

March 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

1 Comment

image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

1 Comment

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